Remarkably intact Mayan canoe discovered in deep sinkhole

Researchers from Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) have announced the discovery of a remarkably well-preserved Mayan canoe in the depths of one of the Yucatán Peninsula’s many cenotes – sinkholes and vast underground pools formed by the collapse of the region’s limestone bedrock. The canoe, measuring 1.6 metres by 80 centimetres, was … Continue reading Remarkably intact Mayan canoe discovered in deep sinkhole

Hunt for ancient Mesoamerican civilisations yields 478 new sites

Lidar – light detection and ranging, a light-based method of remote sensing – has become a valuable tool in archaeology, exposing details about ancient sites that had previously gone unseen in excavations. A team of US and Mexican researchers have used lidar data from over 80,000 square kilometres of southern Mexico to reveal the architecture … Continue reading Hunt for ancient Mesoamerican civilisations yields 478 new sites

Uncovering the secrets of an ancient Mayan city

Archaeologists and researchers decoding the secrets of one of the most magnificent ruins of the Mayan empire – the ancient city of Tikal – have made a ground-breaking discovery that potentially rewrites our understanding of interactions in the ancient Americas. Tikal, in the north of modern-day Guatemala, has been extensively studied since at least the … Continue reading Uncovering the secrets of an ancient Mayan city

Maya monuments and maize in the Americas

Modern technology has helped archaeologists add two more pieces to the puzzle of the history of the Americas. In Mexico, LiDAR (light detection and ranging) equipment uncovered what researchers say is the largest and oldest known Maya monument, while in neighbouring Belize, isotopic analysis of human remains provided the earliest timeline for the adoption of … Continue reading Maya monuments and maize in the Americas