Who’s killing physics? | Cosmos Weekly Taster

This article on the future of physics first appeared in Cosmos Weekly on 15 October 2021. For more stories like this, subscribe to Cosmos Weekly. On a recent visit to my mum’s place, I searched through my old stuff for something my children might like. One book that caught my eyes was (the German edition of) … Continue reading Who’s killing physics? | Cosmos Weekly Taster

When bus timetables and particle physics collide

Imagine taking a time-lapse photograph of a clear sky at night. The photograph will be filled with circular arcs of light that reflect the motion of the stars in the sky as the Earth rotates around its axis. These paths have been the subject of human wonder since the time of ancient civilisations, and our … Continue reading When bus timetables and particle physics collide

Is the Standard Model broken?

Muons have particle physicists in a spin as two hotly anticipated experimental results deviate from theory. This is why it matters. We find ourselves on the cusp of what could be a turning point in fundamental physics. Within weeks of each other, the Muong-2 experiment at Fermilab in the US and the LHCb experiment at … Continue reading Is the Standard Model broken?

Could muons rewrite the laws of physics?

Muons don’t seem to be obeying the standard laws of physics, which suggests we don’t yet fully understand the standard laws of physics, according to an international collaboration of scientists. The team – comprising over 200 physicists from seven countries – sent these subatomic particles zipping around an intensely magnetised track at the Fermi National … Continue reading Could muons rewrite the laws of physics?

W boson spotted in Antarctica

On 6 December 2016, a high-energy particle hurtled from outer space and through an Antarctic ice sheet, where it slammed into an electron at nearly the speed of light. The enormously energetic collision created a completely different particle, which rapidly decayed into a cascade of others. This event might have gone unnoticed – if a … Continue reading W boson spotted in Antarctica

The search for dark matter finds gold

A method for locating seams of gold and other heavy metals is the un­likely spin-off of Swinburne University’s in­volvement in a huge experiment to detect dark matter down a mine in Stawell, Victoria. Associate Professor Alan Duffy, from Swinburne’s Centre for Astrophysics and Super­computing and a member of the Sodium iodide with Active Background REjection … Continue reading The search for dark matter finds gold