Australian Academy of Science welcomes new head

Australian National University Distinguished Professor Chennupati Jagadish has been named as the next president of the Australian Academy of Science. Jagadish, a world-renowned physicist and nanotechnology expert, will serve a four-year term. Jagadish was born in humble circumstances in Andhra Pradesh, south-eastern India, and was largely educated there. He grew up without electricity and studied … Continue reading Australian Academy of Science welcomes new head

Ultra-thin material mimics quantum entangled rare earth compounds

Finnish physicists have created an ultra-thin, 2D material with quantum properties that would usually only be made possible using rare earth minerals. But this new material was fabricated using only common materials. “Studying complex quantum materials is hindered by the properties of naturally occurring compounds,” says atomic physicist Peter Liljeroth from Aalto University. “Our goal … Continue reading Ultra-thin material mimics quantum entangled rare earth compounds

A science poet’s guide to the galaxy – Light

When it comes to complex physics, how do you communicate? Through poetry, of course. Cosmos spoke to Rachel Rayner, Science Explainer about the photon, bringing attention to the many colours of our universe and the need for robust, poetic science communication. Rachel recently wrote an article “A Short History of Light” for Cosmos Magazine issue … Continue reading A science poet’s guide to the galaxy – Light

How do vacuum cleaners work? 4 factors!

Vacuum cleaners are among the handiest household cleaning appliances used today. Vacuum cleaners’ simple yet effective design has done away with having to clean dust and other small particles off surfaces by hand, and turned house cleaning into a more efficient and fairly rapid job. Using nothing but suction, the vacuum whisks away dirt and … Continue reading How do vacuum cleaners work? 4 factors!

Who’s killing physics? | Cosmos Weekly Taster

This article on the future of physics first appeared in Cosmos Weekly on 15 October 2021. For more stories like this, subscribe to Cosmos Weekly. On a recent visit to my mum’s place, I searched through my old stuff for something my children might like. One book that caught my eyes was (the German edition of) … Continue reading Who’s killing physics? | Cosmos Weekly Taster

Who’s killing physics?

On a recent visit to my mum’s place, I searched through my old stuff for something my children might like. One book that caught my eyes was (the German edition of) James Trefil’s Dark Side of the Universe. It’s about cosmology, the Big Bang and the expansion of the universe, Einstein’s theory of general relativity, … Continue reading Who’s killing physics?

2021 Nobel Prize-winners announced

Chemistry The 2021 Nobel Prize in Chemistry has just been awarded for the development of a precise new molecule-building tool. Benjamin List from Germany and Scottish-born David W.C. MacMillan jointly received the prize for this new tool, known as asymmetric organocatalysis. So what is it? Building new functional molecules is key to many types of … Continue reading 2021 Nobel Prize-winners announced

What is quantum entanglement?

Quantum computers, quantum cryptography and quantum (insert name here) are often in the news these days. Articles about them inevitably refer to entanglement, a property of quantum physics that makes all these magical phenomena possible. Untangling quantum entanglement Einstein called entanglement “spooky action at a distance,” a name that has stuck and become increasingly popular. … Continue reading What is quantum entanglement?

A short history of light

A tour of the spectrum beyond the visible, and why dogs help. You are radiating. You always have been. You are radiating at a frequency of 24,000GHz. Perhaps, by the end of this article, you will be radiating at a higher frequency as you discover the exciting link between quantum physics and dogs. Or you … Continue reading A short history of light

Is the Standard Model broken?

Muons have particle physicists in a spin as two hotly anticipated experimental results deviate from theory. This is why it matters. We find ourselves on the cusp of what could be a turning point in fundamental physics. Within weeks of each other, the Muong-2 experiment at Fermilab in the US and the LHCb experiment at … Continue reading Is the Standard Model broken?

Science leaders with purpose

When I started at CSIRO as an intern, in 1984, I had no idea that one day I would end up as Chief Executive of the same organisation. But it was no linear path to get there. When I was 10, my father died. Four years later, when I was 14, I almost died when … Continue reading Science leaders with purpose