Small, diamond-based quantum computers could be in our hands within five years

Small, affordable, ‘plug-and-play’ quantum computing is one step closer. An Australian startup has won $13 million to make its diamond-based computing cores shine. Now it needs to grow. ANU research spinoff Quantum Brilliance has found a way to use synthetic diamonds to drive quantum calculations. Now it’s on a five-year quest to produce commercially viable … Continue reading Small, diamond-based quantum computers could be in our hands within five years

Deep diamonds have surprise organic composition

While most diamonds are formed beneath continents, at depths between 150 and 300 kilometres, a paper published in Scientific Reports has shown that two rarer types of diamond – those found in oceanic rocks, and those that form more than 300 kilometres below the continental crust – have a common, and unexpected, origin. The team … Continue reading Deep diamonds have surprise organic composition

Diamonds put the heat on cells

Using tiny diamonds, or nanodiamonds, scientists have worked out how to measure heat transfer inside living cells – something they say that until now has proved difficult. “A cell’s thermal conductivity – the rate that heat can flow through an object if one side is hot and another is cold – has remained mysterious,” says … Continue reading Diamonds put the heat on cells

Whip you up a diamond? No pressure

Australian-led research has taken a leaf out of Superman’s comic book and created diamonds at room temperature for the first time. Diamond is a substance made of pure carbon, crushed into a crystal structure that is both transparent and incredibly hard. Though it usually takes billions of years to form, this new study produced diamonds … Continue reading Whip you up a diamond? No pressure

Diamonds not behaving like diamonds

Scientists may have found a way to make diamonds more like metal. That probably won’t excite jewellers, but it could open up applications in everything from solar cells and LEDs to optical devices or quantum sensors. In a nutshell, they say they have discovered a way to tweak tiny needles of diamond in a controlled … Continue reading Diamonds not behaving like diamonds

Glass work that proved inspirational

Glass blower Karen Cunningham’s art has inspired a clever bit of science. An Australian team has developed a new kind of hybrid material after she helped them discover that high-performance diamond sensors can be made using conventional glass fibres. And that could open the door to many applications in underwater monitoring, mining and beyond, says … Continue reading Glass work that proved inspirational