Aww, rats: Australian research rodents prove to be poor earners

The most expensive rat on the menu at the Animal Resources Centre (ARC), in Western Australia, costs $872.13. The priciest mouse is $421.70. Both are pregnant “mutants” – that’s the technical term – which have been bred to a specific genetic design for biomedical research. But in 12–18 months, access to either will be strictly … Continue reading Aww, rats: Australian research rodents prove to be poor earners

Using nanotechnology to mend broken hearts

  When Hossein Tavassoli first told his mother that he was researching heart disease, she responded with “But, you’re an engineer…” She was right, of course – Hossein’s undergraduate degree was in material engineering – but at the time, he found it difficult to explain the intersections between biology and engineering. Now, he not only … Continue reading Using nanotechnology to mend broken hearts

Scientists don’t really get the female brain

Science tells us that female and male brains are different yet biomedical research is largely conducted on males, as if they’re a neutral stand-in for the human population as a whole. The problem is, female brains can have starkly different neuroimmune responses from males. And our lack of basic understanding is having a very real … Continue reading Scientists don’t really get the female brain