Human evolution: a last archaic hominin stronghold in India

Scientists trace the evolution and migration of ancient hominins to the edges of India Human history can be characterised perhaps by one skill above all else: the ability to make tools that vastly expand our technological abilities. In fact, for scientists tracing the fascinating, branching tree of human evolution, non-perishable stone tools provide a priceless … Continue reading Human evolution: a last archaic hominin stronghold in India

Men hunt and women gather. But not always

Scientists may have to rethink the prevailing view that prehistoric hunting was exclusively the domain of men. The 9000-year-old remains of a young woman have been found buried with a well-stocked big game hunting toolkit at the Wilamaya Patjxa site in Peru, and subsequent analysis of 27 individuals at sites associated with big-game hunting tools … Continue reading Men hunt and women gather. But not always

More surprises about Palaeolithic humans

New clues continue to unravel the compelling Palaeolithic mystery of modern human movements and the Neanderthal transition, suggesting the two groups overlapped by several thousand years and may have even interacted. Archaeological evidence points to modern human settlement in westernmost Eurasia around 5000 years earlier than previous estimates, toppling suggestions that Neanderthals prevented our ancestors’ … Continue reading More surprises about Palaeolithic humans

The Australian story, told beneath the sea

Submerged archaeological sites discovered off Australia’s northwest coast offer a new window into the migrations, lives and cultures of Aboriginal people thousands of years ago, when the continental shelf was dry. This was a time when around 20 million square kilometres of land was exposed, before the last glacial loosened its grip on the planet … Continue reading The Australian story, told beneath the sea

150-year-old settlement rediscovered

The oldest known Australian example of a communal Irish settlement type has been discovered in country South Australia. An extensive geophysical study of the Baker’s Flat Irish settlement site near Kapunda has found the first – and possibly largest – clachan in Australia, says archaeologist Susan Arthure from Flinders University. It is also thought to … Continue reading 150-year-old settlement rediscovered