COVID Booster: Vaccine popularity goes up, NZ cases go down, 3D-printed ventilators go in and out

Australians are keener on the jab – including for their kids Nearly 80% of Australian parents want to get their children vaccinated against COVID-19, once a vaccine becomes available for them, according to research done by the Australian National University. The research is based on the most recent round of results from ANU’s COVID-19 Impact … Continue reading COVID Booster: Vaccine popularity goes up, NZ cases go down, 3D-printed ventilators go in and out

3D printing rocket and satellite parts

The ability to 3D print satellite parts sounds like something out of science fiction, but Swinburne University of Technology is planning to do just that. The university will install an elaborate 3D-printing system, built by additive manufacturing company Titomic, next year. The system will be able to print a range of different substances – including … Continue reading 3D printing rocket and satellite parts

3D printing is helping paralympians gain an edge

By James Novak, The University of Queensland and Andrew Novak, University of Technology Sydney Major sporting events like the Paralympics are a breeding ground for technological innovation. Athletes, coaches, designers, engineers and sports scientists are constantly looking for the next improvement that will give them the edge. Over the past decade, 3D printing has become … Continue reading 3D printing is helping paralympians gain an edge

3D-printed houses in Australia | Cosmos Weekly Taster

This article first appeared in Cosmos Weekly on 27 August 2021. For more stories like this, subscribe to Cosmos Weekly. As state and federal governments scramble to find solutions for how to best manage the next few years of the pandemic, discussions about the building of for-purpose quarantine centres seem to be getting little traction. … Continue reading 3D-printed houses in Australia | Cosmos Weekly Taster

3D-printed houses in Australia: a viable option?

As state and federal governments scramble to find solutions for how to best manage the next few years of the pandemic, discussions about the building of for-purpose quarantine centres seem to be getting little traction. Some premiers, such as Western Australia’s Mark McGowan, believe it will take years to build new facilities, while Prime Minister … Continue reading 3D-printed houses in Australia: a viable option?

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Sleepy sheep have better sex For rams, the greatest aphrodisiac might be melatonin, according to a study published in Animal Reproduction Science. A team of researchers, led by Dave Kleemann of the South Australian Research and Development Institute, found that treating young Border Leicester rams with melatonin in spring improved semen and sperm quality, testicle … Continue reading You may have missed…

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Ferrets against bird flu For our choice for an Ig Nobel Prize, we nominate a study published in PLOS ONE, where researchers taught ferrets to detect bird flu – in duck poo. Goodbye, sniffer dogs, hello sniffer ferrets! The idea is that the ferrets would be able to detect bird flu in bird poo (say … Continue reading You may have missed…

Good as bone

Australian scientists have 3D-printed bone-like structures containing living cells, which may create a whole new way for surgeons to treat and repair bone tissue. The new study, published in Advanced Functional Materials, describes a unique 3D printing technique. It uses a special ceramic-based ink to produce a soft structure that closely mimics bone tissue – … Continue reading Good as bone

Printed tongues take some licking

British scientists have 3D-printed some rather sophisticated fake tongues – even if they don’t actually look like tongues. In a paper in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, they describe creating synthetic silicone structures that realistically mimic the topology, elasticity and “wettability” of the real thing. These factors are instrumental in how food or … Continue reading Printed tongues take some licking

3D printing with a bit of give and take

Materials scientists in the US say they have learned how to make liquid crystal shape-shift. That may not immediately strike a chord with those who aren’t materials scientists, but it’s the key to a new 3D-printing method the team says could make it easier to manufacture and control the shape of soft robots, artificial muscles … Continue reading 3D printing with a bit of give and take