On Monday 10 July NASA’s Juno spacecraft swooped over the Great Red Spot, a centuries-old storm on Jupiter that is larger than Earth itself. While passing at an altitude of some 9,000 km it snapped four close-up shots that show new depths of the fascinating feature.

The raw images, shown above, may look a little drab, but soon after they were received on Earth on Wednesday 12 July NASA released them to the public. Below are enhanced versions by citizen scientists that play with colour and contrast to reveal stunning detail and structure.

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credit: Nasa / SwRI / MSSS / Kevin Gill
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credit: NASA / SwRI / MSSS / Gerald Eichstädt
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NASA / JPL-Caltech / SwRI / MSSS / Roman Tkachenko
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credit: NASA / SwRI / MSSS / Gerald Eichstädt / Seán Doran
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credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / SwRI / MSSS / Roman Tkachenko