Mars rover spied from Mars orbit


The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter catches a glimpse of the Curiosity rover far below.


The northwestern flank of Mount Sharp, as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The bright blue dot is the Curiosity Mars rover.
The northwestern flank of Mount Sharp, as seen by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The bright blue dot is the Curiosity Mars rover.
NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

This scene shows the northwestern flank of Mount Sharp, on Mars, as seen by NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The bright blue shape at the cenre of the image is the Curiosity rover, which is about 3 metres long and almost as wide.

The snap was taken on 5 June 2017. The orbiter takes a picture of Curiosity and surrounds every 3 months or so, to keep an eye out for movement of sand dunes and erosion that might affect the rover’s future path.

When the image was taken, Curiosity was partway between its investigation of active sand dunes lower on Mount Sharp, and Vera Rubin Ridge, a destination uphill where the rover team intends to examine outcrops where hematite has been identified from Mars orbit.

Latest Stories
MoreMore Articles