Blog Space 25 September 2015

Detailed Pluto images keep on coming from New Horizons


NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft captured this high-resolution enhanced colour view of Pluto that combines blue, red and infrared images taken by the Ralph/Multispectral Visual Imaging Camera (MVIC). Many landforms have their own distinct colours, telling a complex geological and climatological story that scientists have only just begun to decode. The image resolves details and colors on scales as small as 1.3 kilometres.
NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI

An extended colour image of Pluto taken by NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft shows rounded and bizarrely textured mountains, informally named the Tartarus Dorsa, that rise up along Pluto’s day-night terminator. This view, roughly 530 kilometres across, combines blue, red and infrared images taken by the Ralph/Multispectral Visual Imaging Camera (MVIC) on 14 July.
NASA/JHUAPL/SWRI

Here, enhanced colour has been added from the global colour image. This image is about 530 kilometres across.
NASA/JHUAPL/SWRI

High-resolution images of Pluto taken by NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft just before closest approach on 14 July are the sharpest images to date of Pluto’s varied terrain—revealing details down to scales of 270 metres. In this 120-kilometre section taken from the larger, high-resolution mosaic above, the textured surface of the plain surrounds two isolated ice mountains.
NASA/JHUAPL/SWRI

Latest Stories
MoreMore Articles