What are IVF success rates by age?

If you are considering in vitro fertilisation (IVF), you may want to know what the IVF success rates are. Most people don’t have a baby after a single round of IVF, but the chances of success increase the younger you start, new data suggests. IVF is a technique that helps people get pregnant. It involves … Continue reading What are IVF success rates by age?

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Snow monkeys fishing in the winter Most monkeys are found in warm climates, but Japanese macaques are an adaptable species, inhabiting the coldest places in the world for non-human primates: the high-altitude area of Kamikochi and Shiga Kogen in Japan. Now, researchers have discovered how these monkeys survive the harsh winters, when temperatures can get … Continue reading You may have missed…

Time to lower Australia’s blood pressure

Australia is falling behind on blood pressure management, according to a group of leading experts who have published an editorial in the Medical Journal of Australia. While the number of Australians with high blood pressure isn’t increasing, those with high blood pressure make up over a third of the adult population (34%) – and many … Continue reading Time to lower Australia’s blood pressure

Ivermectin could throw a lifeline to endangered Australian sea lions

Ivermectin has been burdened with a seriously bad reputation in recent times. Infamously – and incorrectly – touted as a wonder cure for COVID-19 by, the drug has emerged from the turmoil of the pandemic as something of a snake-oil equivalent in the collective psyche. But this image is undeserved – despite being thoroughly debunked … Continue reading Ivermectin could throw a lifeline to endangered Australian sea lions

Where did the honey bee come from?

It has, apparently, been a long-standing and hotly contested debate in science: from where did our beloved honey bee come? Now, new research from York University, Canada, has potentially identified the sweet spot, with all signs pointing to Asia. The western honey bee (Apis mellifera) is used for crop pollination and honey production all around … Continue reading Where did the honey bee come from?

Crafty coastal species are colonising plastics – with potentially devastating results

The sheer volume of plastics dumped, trickled or escaped into our oceans is seen as a major global problem, threatening biodiversity, injuring or killing vulnerable marine animals, and even harming human health. Now, new research shows life can bloom even in the direst of places: coastal plants and animals are actually colonising floating plastic debris … Continue reading Crafty coastal species are colonising plastics – with potentially devastating results

COVID Booster: HIV, variants and asthma

Address HIV to lower the risk of variants The science on the Omicron variant of COVID-19 is not going to be well understood for a few weeks at least, but a perspective in Nature makes one thing clear: even if this variant didn’t emerge in an HIV-positive person, the HIV/AIDS epidemic is the perfect breeding … Continue reading COVID Booster: HIV, variants and asthma

How to read a jellyfish’s mind

Jellyfish may be brainless, but that didn’t stop these scientists from reading their minds – well, sort of. Researchers from the California Institute of Technology devised a clever way to tinker with the genes of Clytia hemisphaerica – a tiny, transparent jelly only centimetres in diameter – that makes their neurons glow with fluorescent light, … Continue reading How to read a jellyfish’s mind

How to use drones responsibly in Kakadu

Drones have transformed conservation and land management over the past decade, making it easier than ever to collect high-quality data. But like all new technologies, they come with new ethical quandaries – particularly when used on country managed by Indigenous Australians. A group of researchers, Jawoyn Traditional Owners, and Indigenous Rangers, have addressed this with … Continue reading How to use drones responsibly in Kakadu

Pedalling towards better health

Bicycle riders have long known that riding maintains fitness, and biking has been used as a tool to promote public health – for instance, through the creation of urban cycling maps designed to assist riders in finding optimum routes. Now, a new study led by Colorado State University (CSU), US, has for the first time … Continue reading Pedalling towards better health

Something in the air – environmental pollutants may skew sex ratios at birth

Measured from the moment of conception, the ratio of male to female embryos is almost exactly 1:1. Yet, the ratio of baby boys to baby girls born each year fluctuates perceptibly over time. What forces are at play that swing the balance one way or the other? A new study, led by Andrey Rzhetsky of … Continue reading Something in the air – environmental pollutants may skew sex ratios at birth

Quantum spin liquid observed in physics first

After 50 years of hunting, physicists have finally observed a new state of matter known as a quantum spin liquid. “It is a very special moment in the field,” says physicist Mikhail Lukin, co-director of the Harvard Quantum Initiative (HQI) and a senior author on the study in Science. “You can really touch, poke, and … Continue reading Quantum spin liquid observed in physics first