Mark Pesce

Mark Pesce

Mark Pesce invented the technology for 3D on the Web, has written seven books, was for seven years a judge on the ABC's "The New Inventors", founded postgraduate programs at USC and AFTRS, holds an honorary appointment at Sydney University, is a multiple-award-winning columnist for The Register, pens another column for IEEE Spectrum, and is a professional futurist and public speaker. Pesce hosts both the award-winning "The Next Billion Seconds" and "This Week in Startups Australia" podcasts.

  • AI: is it starting to speak our language?

    Two new advances – Copilot and MT-NLG – show signs that the promise of AI is upon us: taking care...

    When someone once commented on the obvious African influences in his paintings, Pablo Picasso famously said, “Good ar...

    November 19, 2021
  • Archiving the World Wide Web

    Ever since the internet’s “big-bang” moment, archivists have struggled to keep up with its burgeo...

    Twenty-eight years ago this month, I got onto the World Wide Web. First among my friends – and among the first few th...

    October 29, 2021
  • Future power strategy: electrify everything

    When it comes to renewables-generated electricity, Australia might well be the luckiest country. ...

    When Hurricane Ida slammed into the lowest-lying areas of Louisiana in August of 2021, many expected that the most po...

    October 8, 2021
  • Planet Smartwatch: Being an island of data in a world of change

    Smart apps can already track our reductions in calories. Let’s get smarter and start counting our...

    Last year in Cosmos magazine, I wrote all about my growing love affair with my smartwatch. With it I’d built the inte...

    September 17, 2021
  • Across the Metaverse

    Mark Zuckerberg’s next new thing is decades old, and we’ve been experiencing it in all sorts of w...

    Have you heard about the “metaverse”? It’s the next new thing, according to Facebook founder-and-CEO-for-life Mark Zu...

    August 27, 2021
  • A token of safety

    Tim Berners-Lee’s sale of the web’s origin code has turned the spotlight again to NFTs as a busin...

    In June, the father of the World Wide Web, Sir Tim Berners-Lee, took his original source code for the very first Web ...

    August 6, 2021
  • Do you see what I see?

    Move over ‘video’ meetings, and step right in ‘videogrammetry’: the next-gen version of Zoom et a...

    In the middle of May, Google dropped a surprising new demo on us: “Project Starline” shows people communicating in wh...

    July 16, 2021
  • Teeny tiny transistors

    Recent breakthroughs suggest the long-held promise of nanotechnology may be with us. But only if ...

    Back in May, a research team spread across the United States and Taiwan made a stunning announcement: they’d mastered...

    June 25, 2021
  • The surprisingly complicated technology that goes into picking winners

    Choosing and gathering an apple is simple for humans, but it’s a task that has frustrated robotic...

    This article first appeared in Cosmos Weekly on 4 June 2021. For more stories like this, subscribe to Cosmos Weekly. ...

    June 14, 2021
  • The surprisingly complicated technology that goes into picking winners

    Choosing and gathering an apple is simple for humans, but it’s a task that has frustrated robotic...

    Can robots be trained to pick up after us? A recent breakthrough in machine learning could point the way toward a muc...

    June 4, 2021
  • Where’s my flying car?

    The Jetsons cartoons gave a boomer generation a vision of seemingly magical powered flying vehicl...

    Backed by billions in venture capital and a recent IPO, one startup aims to have its flying taxi on the market in thr...

    May 14, 2021
  • Y2Q: quantum computing and the end of internet security

    Will quantum computing pick the digital lock of all our most precious secrets?

    What if you woke up one morning to find all locks had disappeared? Not just the one on your front door, or the lock o...

    April 23, 2021

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