Kate Ravilious

Kate Ravilious

Kate Ravilious is a freelance science journalist, based in York, UK.

Kate Ravilious is an award-winning independent science journalist, based in York, UK. She writes about the latest discoveries in the scientific world and has a particular passion for earth sciences and archaeology. Her work is published in magazines and newspapers and on websites including, New ScientistThe Guardian,The Daily Telegraph, The IndependentBBC Focus magazineNational Geographic daily news, Archaeology and Environmental Research Web.

Kate started out as a geologist, but after slicing up thousands of rocks for her PhD she realised that she was too impatient to be a scientist, and better suited to being nosy about other people’s research. In 2000 she won The Daily Telegraph/BASF Young Science Writer of the Year and was runner up in the New Scientist/Wellcome Trust Millennial Science Essay Competition.

Since then she has been writing features and news stories about topics ranging from beetles that harvest raindrops to aggressive drivers that cause traffic jams. In addition Kate provides media and writing skills courses to scientists.

At home Kate is mother to two young children, Beth and Kester, and she blogs about parenting science.

  • Are these the Earth’s earliest lifeforms?

    A new discovery suggest microbes lived round hydrothermal vents just 250 million years after the ...

    A black smoker chimney on the south-eastern edge of the iguanas vent field near the Galapagos Islands.Universal Histo...

    March 3, 2017
  • Iran’s pistachio growers get that sinking feeling

    Thirsty crops are draining groundwater faster than it is being replenished – with disastrous resu...

    Iran's famous pistachio farms are draining the underlying aquifer, causing the ground to slump and crack.Kaveh Kazemi...

    February 16, 2017
  • Two huge magma plumes fed the Deccan Traps eruption

    Two vast hotspots fuelled the eruption that contributed to one of the greatest extinction events ...

    Thick lava flows in Hawaii are nothing compared to the mammoth rivers of hot rock that rolled across in India in the ...

    February 9, 2017
  • The tricky science of tracking and predicting volcanic eruptions

    Sophisticated gas monitoring devices and satellite GPS data are starting to give scientists a fig...

    The Japanese city of Kagoshima sits near the base of the active volcano Sakurajima.Jim Holmes / Getty ImagesIt was ju...

    February 7, 2017
  • Australian dig shows signs of earliest human habitation

    The first people in Australia travelled through the arid interior 10,000 years earlier than we pr...

    An aerial view of the Northern Flinders Ranges where Warratyi Rock Shelter was discovered.Giles HammPeople began to v...

    November 2, 2016
  • Beyond radiocarbon: how archaeologists date artefacts

    When carbon dating isn't reliable, scientists turn to other techniques. But they can be controver...

    Optically stimulated luminescence can find out how long ago samples were last exposed to the sun. The laser, shown he...

    November 2, 2016
  • Trees and plants reached ‘peak carbon’ 10 years ago

    More atmospheric carbon dioxide in the 1960s meant greenery flourished – but our photosynthesisin...

    Photography by Mangiwau / Getty ImagesTrees and plants have had enough. For the past few decades they've obliged us b...

    October 2, 2016
  • Megavolcanoes on supercontinents obliterated life

    Why did some monster eruptions trigger global catastrophe while others did not? Kate Ravilious sp...

    Today’s eruptions, such as this 2014 flow from the Bardarbunga Volcano in Iceland, are nothing compared to past ‘floo...

    September 19, 2016
  • Smog can trigger floods and tornadoes

    We know air pollution makes us wheeze, but can it also play havoc with our weather? Kate Raviliou...

    Flash floods and landslides triggered by torrential rains cover buildings in Mianyang city, Beichuan County. Research...

    July 13, 2015
  • Signs of life in meteorites from Mars?

    Gases in the red planet's rocks could sustain Martian microbes. By Kate Ravilious.

    This Martian meteorite weighing 320 grams was found in the Sahara desert in 2011. Scientists have recently detected ...

    June 29, 2015
  • Kathmandu earthquake nightmare not yet over

    Geologists believe unrelieved strain still remains within the fault line that ruptured in Nepal o...

    The devastating magnitude 7.8 earthquake that rocked Nepal on Saturday could be repeated within the next decade or tw...

    April 27, 2015
  • Looking for microbes on Mars

    Scientists are fossicking in our planet's most unearthly places to practise searching for lif...

    As I step out of the lift shaft I’m hit by a roaring, warm, dry wind. The air tastes salty and, as my eyes adjust to ...

    January 29, 2015

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