Ellen Phiddian

Ellen Phiddian

Ellen Phiddian is a science journalist at The Royal Institution of Australia.

  • You may have missed…

    Stray science stories from last week to cheer up your Monday.

    Sharks aren’t so scary Sharks have a very frightening role in our cultural history, but Australians don’t find the...

    March 1, 2021
  • Rotating rocket science

    Australian engineers complete successful test of new rocket engine.

    As Australia’s space industry gears up, a team of Australian researchers has successfully tested a new type of engine...

    March 1, 2021
  • COVID booster: vaccine news and game theory

    Five things science learned last week about COVID-19.

    A toolkit to speed up vaccine development and research An international team, including researchers from Griffith ...

    February 28, 2021
  • Massive study shows Pfizer vaccine is effective

    A nation-wide study has once again found the vaccine works.

    A study with over half a million subjects has found the Pfizer mRNA vaccine to be 92% effective at preventing infecti...

    February 25, 2021
  • 5G: more science, same safety

    New standards aim to shine a light on the scientific evidence.

    The Australian guidelines for radio wave safety have been updated for the first time in nearly 20 years. The Australi...

    February 25, 2021
  • Cosmos Briefing: Building Australia’s Space Industry

    Experts discuss Australia’s future in space.

    Australia’s Space Agency is young, but that doesn’t mean we should be underestimated in space: that’s the message fro...

    February 25, 2021
  • Towards a Strep A vaccine

    Researchers use novel technique to produce a vaccine candidate for deadly Streptococcus A.

    New research from Griffith University’s Institute for Glycomics, Queensland, has advanced the development of a vaccin...

    February 24, 2021
  • How to jet power wind turbines

    Fast lower-atmosphere winds have a complicated effect on wind power.

    Wind farms and their turbines have been growing over the past decade – both in area and in height. The larger a tu...

    February 24, 2021
  • Really ancient art

    A kangaroo painting is now Australia’s oldest known rock art.

    An image of a kangaroo has been identified as Australia’s oldest known rock painting, dated to over 17,000 years old....

    February 23, 2021
  • Medieval tipples

    New research finds evidence of winemaking in Islamic Sicily.

    Chemical residue from grapes has been found inside medieval containers from Islamic Sicily, suggesting there was wine...

    February 23, 2021
  • You may have missed…

    Stray science stories from last week to cheer up your Monday.

    Please wear a mask when taking selfies with gorillas Gorillas can catch SARS-CoV-2 from humans: in January, it spr...

    February 22, 2021
  • Passing oil pollution from dolphin to calf

    Oil spills affect dolphin health for a decade and counting.

    The 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill and subsequent oil pollution have had long-term health effects for dolphins, accordi...

    February 19, 2021
  • Ancient mammoth DNA

    The oldest DNA found in the world has been sequenced from a mammoth specimen.

    Ancient DNA is famously tough to extract and identify. Until today, the oldest sequenced DNA came from a horse that h...

    February 18, 2021
  • Dinosaurs take a hike

    Drops in carbon dioxide levels may have allowed herbivorous dinosaurs to get to Greenland.

    A new paper pinpoints the date that a large group of dinosaurs made it to Greenland, suggesting that climatic changes...

    February 16, 2021
  • COVID Booster: Inhalable droplets and talking to kids

    Five things science learned about COVID last week.

    Nebuliser might be responsible for transmission in hotel quarantine Nebulisers – medical devices that turn liquid ...

    February 14, 2021
  • Explainer: Titan’s chemistry

    Atomic-force microscopy allows new understanding of Saturn’s moon.

    New research from the Astrophysical Journal has identified some of the intricate molecules and reactions happening on...

    February 13, 2021
  • Brain buster

    Genes help explain differences between Neanderthal and human brains.

    Researchers have identified a mutated gene that appears to be responsible for a large disparity between Neanderthal a...

    February 12, 2021
  • Conch shell tones

    Ancient conch makes music for the first time in 17,000 years.

    How old-fashioned is your taste in music? Researchers have recreated notes from a 17,000-year-old conch shell, found ...

    February 11, 2021
  • Pollen likes the heat

    You can expect worse allergy seasons as the climate warms.

    Climate change is causing allergy seasons to start earlier, last longer, and be more intense, according to a new stud...

    February 10, 2021

Read science facts, not fiction...

There’s never been a more important time to explain the facts, cherish evidence-based knowledge and to showcase the latest scientific, technological and engineering breakthroughs. Cosmos is published by The Royal Institution of Australia, a charity dedicated to connecting people with the world of science. Financial contributions, however big or small, help us provide access to trusted science information at a time when the world needs it most. Please support us by making a donation or purchasing a subscription today.