Amalyah Hart

Amalyah Hart

Amalyah Hart is a science journalist based in Melbourne.

  • Year of the quiet ocean

    An international team aims to monitor the impact of 2020’s ‘quiet’ oceans on marine life

    Last year, as pandemic-related lockdowns enveloped the world, our oceans – just like our cities – fell more silent th...

    April 8, 2021
  • Bone tools from the Kimberley among oldest in Australia

    A new study of bone artefacts found in the Kimberley region reveals the secrets of their deep ant...

    The rugged Kimberley region of Western Australia is home to vast tracts of land – a savannah landscape of ranges and ...

    April 7, 2021
  • Poorer children “failed by system”

    Study reveals the extent of poverty as a barrier to education in low and middle income countries.

    Poorer children with academic promise in low- and middle-income countries are struggling to access higher education, ...

    April 7, 2021
  • Animal poo may make food safer

    Despite concerns that animal manure can spread dangerous pathogens, a new study suggests organic ...

    A new study suggests that animal manure (poo) may be a safer bet than conventional fertilisers in protecting the publ...

    April 7, 2021
  • Marine species flee the equator

    Warming waters are triggering a mass exodus of marine creatures from the tropics.

    A new global study reveals that the biodiversity of marine species around the equator has dropped, as warming seas fo...

    April 6, 2021
  • Ancient Pilbara rocks speak of Earth’s first continents

    A new study of rocks in Western Australia’s Pilbara region rewrites the history of early continen...

    A new study of the famous iron-red rocks in Western Australia’s arid Pilbara region has revealed that the formation o...

    April 1, 2021
  • The staggering cost of biological invasion

    New study reveals that invasive species have cost US$1.28 trillion globally over the past 50 years.

    Invasive species have cost the planet US$1.28 trillion over the past 50 years, according to a new analysis published ...

    April 1, 2021
  • Papua New Guinea COVID-19 update

    The COVID crisis in PNG worsens as a new strain is identified and 8,000 vaccines are delivered.

    As the COVID-19 crisis besieging Papua New Guinea (PNG) escalates, the nation’s healthcare system is over-burdened an...

    March 31, 2021
  • 2I/Borisov: Interstellar interloper

    New comet is only the second ever interstellar visitor detected entering our solar system.

    It’s only the second interstellar visitor a telescope on our planet has ever recorded (pipped to the post by Oumuamua...

    March 31, 2021
  • Prosthetic fin for injured turtles

    Innovative new prosthetic fin approved for trial on real, threatened turtles.

    A New Zealand researcher’s innovative new design for a prosthetic turtle fin could help rehabilitate injured sea turt...

    March 30, 2021
  • Ancient tree-climbing kangaroo discovered

    Researchers discover extinct kangaroo adapted for life in the upper storey.

    Researchers have discovered an extinct tree-climbing kangaroo species, which boasted powerful hind- and forelimbs, gr...

    March 24, 2021
  • Diverse crocodiles underwent rapid evolution

    New study reveals ancient crocodiles were far more disparate than today, thanks to rapid evolution.

    Ancient crocodile species were far more diverse than their modern counterparts, occupying niches held today by animal...

    March 24, 2021
  • Explainer: Cryptocurrency

    How digital currencies work, and why we should care.

    Fuelled by a boom, Bitcoin “mining” is thought to be producing enough CO2 to rival the city of London, and consuming ...

    March 20, 2021
  • How to survive a mass extinction

    New study reveals how life on earth recovered after the most devastating mass extinction in geolo...

    Life on earth has been assaulted multiple times over its long history, by vicious mass extinctions and crashes in bio...

    March 19, 2021
  • Recycling hero: Justin Chalker

    The recycling whizz-kid saving the planet one novel polymer at a time.

    The new polymer is made from recycled canola oil, sheeps wool, and sulphur. Credit: Flinders University. Most peop...

    March 18, 2021
  • Rare bone tool artefact revealed

    Discovery on the Murray gives insight into ancient Australia.

    Analysis of a crafted bone point unearthed on Ngarrindjeri country in South Australia is shedding new light on the be...

    March 17, 2021
  • Novel solution for deadly allergies

    Researchers may have found the key to preventing killer allergic reactions – embedded in our own ...

    Researchers at the Australian National University (ANU) have discovered a function in the immune system that could ho...

    March 15, 2021
  • Birdsong baffles babies

    Researchers find that baby brains are bolstered by lemur and human voices – but not by birdsong.

    The blue-eyed black lemur (Elemur flavirons) may be a close genetic cousin of ours, but these small, lanky tree-dwell...

    March 12, 2021
  • Bitcoin boom has huge carbon footprint

    Researcher finds that Bitcoin mining alone may rival the carbon footprint of all global data cent...

    Cryptocurrencies have surged in popularity and dominated news headlines in the first quarter of 2021, with Bitcoin – ...

    March 11, 2021
  • How a baby T-Rex bites

    Researchers use 3D modelling to examine the jaws of different-sized tyrannosaurs.

    Finite element analysis results for an adult Tyrannosaurus rex (FMNH PR 2081) jaw demonstrating a range of biting str...

    March 10, 2021
  • Looking for lung cancer

    The US has widened the pool of people eligible for annual lung cancer screening.

    The US Department of Health is now recommending the cohort of Americans eligible for yearly lung cancer screening be ...

    March 10, 2021

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