Not-so-permafrost


Methane is already bubbling up as the Arctic thaws


Methane bubbles up from the thawed permafrost at the bottom of the thermokarst lake through the ice at its surface.
Methane bubbles up from the thawed permafrost at the bottom of the thermokarst lake through the ice at its surface.
Katey Walter Anthony/ University of Alaska Fairbanks

The expected gradual thawing and the associated release of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere from the Arctic permafrost may actually be sped up by instances of a relatively little-known process called abrupt thawing. Abrupt thawing takes place under a certain type of Arctic lake, known as a thermokarst lake, that forms as permafrost thaws.

The impact on the climate may mean an influx of permafrost-derived methane into the atmosphere in the mid-21st century, which is not currently accounted for in climate projections.

The Arctic landscape stores one of the largest natural reservoirs of organic carbon in the world in its frozen soils. But once thawed, soil microbes in the permafrost can turn that carbon into the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane, which then enter the atmosphere and contribute to climate warming.

“The mechanism of abrupt thaw and thermokarst lake formation matters a lot for the permafrost-carbon feedback this century,” said first author Katey Walter Anthony at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, who led the project that was part of NASA’s Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE), a ten-year program to understand climate change effects on the Arctic. “We don’t have to wait 200 or 300 years to get these large releases of permafrost carbon. Within my lifetime, my children’s lifetime, it should be ramping up. It’s already happening but it’s not happening at a really fast rate right now, but within a few decades, it should peak.”

The results were published in Nature Communications.

  1. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-05738-9
  2. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-05738-9
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