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Three-minute thesis: Does breathing kill?


When bacteria reach the central nervous system, the results can be deadly. But how do they get there in the first place?



Scientist

Heidi Walkden, Griffith University.

PhD title

Bacterial infection of the brain: how bacteria penetrate the CNS by invading peripheral nerves

Summary

“Bacterial infections of the central nervous system (CNS), though uncommon, are associated with very high rates of morbidity and mortality. To date, the pathways by which bacteria enter the CNS remain largely unknown, with novel evidence suggesting certain pathogens can enter the brain via the cranial nerves innervating the nasal cavity. This project aims to identify which bacterial species can use peripheral nerves to enter the brain.”


The finals of the 2017 Asia-Pacific Three-Minute Thesis (3MT) competition, which challenges PhD students to communicate their research in a snappy three-minute presentation, were held on the 29 September at the University of Queensland, St Lucia Campus. Competitors came from 55 Universities from across Australia, New Zealand and North and South-East Asia.

The presentations were judged by distinguished figures in Australian science including Cosmos editor-in-chief Elizabeth Finkel.

Curated content from the editorial staff at Cosmos Magazine.
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