Art meets neuroscience


Vote for your favourite brain image for a chance to win it.


A single neuron inside a rat's brain -- one of the images in contention in QBI people's choice award for photography.
A single neuron inside a rat's brain -- one of the images in contention in QBI people's choice award for photography.
QBI

Science and art collide to produce a stunning showcase of images, which are the final entries in this year’s Art in Neuroscience contest, organised by the Queensland Brain Institute (QBI).

In its tenth year, this unique competition highlights pictures taken by students, researchers and technical staff from the Institute’s neuroscience laboratories. In the past, the images have gone on to grace the covers of leading science journals such as Nature.

The contest will afford you a snapshot, both literal and metaphorical, into the work that goes on at QBI, which is based at the University of Queensland. The 50 entries were narrowed down to just 10 by judges from the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art and the university’s own art museum.

The images vary in their versatility and impact. A photograph of the tau protein, which does such ugly things to the brain in Alzheimer’s disease, looks paradoxically beautiful. A singular neuron looks like an exotic creature from the depths of the ocean.

So, have your say in the QBI people’s choice competition, which is on now. You stand a chance to win your favourite print.

If that's piqued your interest and you want to marvel at more images, click here.

The next issue of Cosmos magazine is dedicated to exploring the intersection between art and science, and features interviews with many leading practitioners in both fields. In stores in January, subscribe today or request a pre-order here.

Geetanjali Rangnekar is a science communicator and editor, based in Adelaide, Australia.
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